Religious Education in India: Debates and Experiences

  • Manisha Sethi Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India

Abstract

Religious education has remained largely absent from school and university curricula in India though its significance has been underlined by a plethora of government committees on education. Its absence can be traced to the imperatives of rule, both in the colonial period, and in post Independent India, and the need to balance competing claims and pressures. This paper shows how, on the one hand, the policy of religious neutrality – and later avowed secularism – and on the other, a desire for inculcation of moral, “spiritual” and “Indian” values tended to favour a natural religion approach. This idea of natural religion though comes to be inflected with a majoritarian bias.

Author Biography

Manisha Sethi, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India

Dr. Manisha Sethi is Assistant Professor at the Centre for the Study of Comparative Religions and Civilizations, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India.

References

Published
2018-09-30
How to Cite
SETHI, Manisha. Religious Education in India: Debates and Experiences. Changing Societies & Personalities, [S.l.], v. 2, n. 3, p. 249-259, sep. 2018. ISSN 2587-8964. Available at: <https://changing-sp.com/ojs/index.php/csp/article/view/43>. Date accessed: 16 dec. 2018. doi: https://doi.org/10.15826/csp.2018.2.3.041.